Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

Several techniques have been proposed for the ultrasonic characterization of metals, ceramics and composite materials. For highly attenuative materials, e. g., fiber-reinforced composites, either the sound phase velocity, or the attenuation can usually be determined. In this paper, we extend the correlation method for simultaneous measurement of phase velocity and attenuation in liquids, first proposed by Sedlacek and Asenbaum1, to the case of highly attenuative solids. By using specially designed specimens in the shape of wedges, the path of propagation can be continuously varied. Cross-correlations of pressure amplitude and phase between different points in the field of continuous ultrasonic plane waves allow measurement of attenuation and phase velocity. Experiments performed on several specimens of various polymers confirm the efficiency and reliability of the technique. Corrections due to refraction and other effects are also discussed and evaluated.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6A

Chapter

Chapter 1: General Techniques—Fundamentals

Section

Other Techniques

Pages

491-499

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_56

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Simultaneous Measurements of Ultrasonic Phase Velocity and Attenuation in Solids

La Jolla, CA

Several techniques have been proposed for the ultrasonic characterization of metals, ceramics and composite materials. For highly attenuative materials, e. g., fiber-reinforced composites, either the sound phase velocity, or the attenuation can usually be determined. In this paper, we extend the correlation method for simultaneous measurement of phase velocity and attenuation in liquids, first proposed by Sedlacek and Asenbaum1, to the case of highly attenuative solids. By using specially designed specimens in the shape of wedges, the path of propagation can be continuously varied. Cross-correlations of pressure amplitude and phase between different points in the field of continuous ultrasonic plane waves allow measurement of attenuation and phase velocity. Experiments performed on several specimens of various polymers confirm the efficiency and reliability of the technique. Corrections due to refraction and other effects are also discussed and evaluated.