Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

We describe the application of a method for ultrasonic imaging of flaws in solids. These methods greatly extend earlier work along these lines at Rockwell and the Langenberg group in Germany, see [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]. The new inversion methods allow reflector imaging and parameter estimation in progressively more complex media with progressively more realistic source/receiver configurations. This research has been carried out in the context of seismic exploration. However, the problems are sufficiently similar that these more realistic models have direct counterparts in nondestructive testing [11,12,13,14,15,16,17]. In particular, both problems are high frequency inverse scattering problems. High frequency means that the wavelengths are much smaller (by a factor of three or more) than the other length scales of the problem.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Imaging, Microscopy, Inversion and Reconstruction

Section

Inversion and Reconstruction

Pages

573-583

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_65

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Imaging of Flaws in Solids by Velocity Inversion

La Jolla, CA

We describe the application of a method for ultrasonic imaging of flaws in solids. These methods greatly extend earlier work along these lines at Rockwell and the Langenberg group in Germany, see [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]. The new inversion methods allow reflector imaging and parameter estimation in progressively more complex media with progressively more realistic source/receiver configurations. This research has been carried out in the context of seismic exploration. However, the problems are sufficiently similar that these more realistic models have direct counterparts in nondestructive testing [11,12,13,14,15,16,17]. In particular, both problems are high frequency inverse scattering problems. High frequency means that the wavelengths are much smaller (by a factor of three or more) than the other length scales of the problem.