Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

The objectives of this research program are to develop and evaluate electromagnetic sensor arrays for use in NDE and robotics. The work at SRI has focused on the use of inductive sensors; parallel work at Stanford University [1] has emphasized capacitive sensors. The previously reported wire-wound coil sensor [2], consisting of a drive coil and several smaller pickup coils, uses a technology that is not well suited for constructing an array. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of such a sensor is limited by the practical size of the pickup coils. In this paper we describe the development of a sensor array that uses printed-circuit technology to overcome these limitations. We expect that printed-circuit technology will simplify the fabrication of an array, permit precise replication of the array elements, reduce the minimum achievable size of individual array elements to improve spatial resolution, and allow the construction of two-dimensional arrays.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6A

Chapter

Chapter 3: Sensors and Probes

Section

Electromagnetics

Pages

745-750

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_84

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Inductive Sensor Arrays for NDE and Robotics

La Jolla, CA

The objectives of this research program are to develop and evaluate electromagnetic sensor arrays for use in NDE and robotics. The work at SRI has focused on the use of inductive sensors; parallel work at Stanford University [1] has emphasized capacitive sensors. The previously reported wire-wound coil sensor [2], consisting of a drive coil and several smaller pickup coils, uses a technology that is not well suited for constructing an array. Furthermore, the spatial resolution of such a sensor is limited by the practical size of the pickup coils. In this paper we describe the development of a sensor array that uses printed-circuit technology to overcome these limitations. We expect that printed-circuit technology will simplify the fabrication of an array, permit precise replication of the array elements, reduce the minimum achievable size of individual array elements to improve spatial resolution, and allow the construction of two-dimensional arrays.