Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

Automated ultrasonic testing (UT) of big structures poses particular problems related directly to economics and productivity. Generally, UT examinations on these large structures are performed with multiple channels to reduce scan time and collect data from various orientations. The amount of resulting data also is quite large. Traditional approaches have relied on up-front gating and signal thresholding to reduce the amount of data recorded. This has been a practical approach, as the capability of data processing and recording devices has also been limited. Even with the incorporation of computer technology, most systems performing UT of large structures still operate on this same data acquisition principle. General purpose computer configurations lack the performance to provide any substantial improvement in data analysis. Computer resources have been focused on number crunching, data summary, and data comparison using general criteria such as signal amplitude and sound path location. In practice, examiners use this type of system to identify areas of concern and then perform “re-looks” while observing the instrument A-scan display. Years of experience are then applied in interactive analysis of the A-scans for final resolution. For the particular area of concern, as much additional information as possible is collected (e.g., different angles and orientations) to provide information crucial to the final disposition. If the system collected the proper data and was capable of presenting these data in a meaningful format, this manual “re-look” procedure would not be necessary.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Image Analysis, Signal Processing and AI

Section

Image Analysis and Signal Processing

Pages

825-830

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_94

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

A Highly Interactive System for Processing Large Volumes of Ultrasonic Testing Data

La Jolla, CA

Automated ultrasonic testing (UT) of big structures poses particular problems related directly to economics and productivity. Generally, UT examinations on these large structures are performed with multiple channels to reduce scan time and collect data from various orientations. The amount of resulting data also is quite large. Traditional approaches have relied on up-front gating and signal thresholding to reduce the amount of data recorded. This has been a practical approach, as the capability of data processing and recording devices has also been limited. Even with the incorporation of computer technology, most systems performing UT of large structures still operate on this same data acquisition principle. General purpose computer configurations lack the performance to provide any substantial improvement in data analysis. Computer resources have been focused on number crunching, data summary, and data comparison using general criteria such as signal amplitude and sound path location. In practice, examiners use this type of system to identify areas of concern and then perform “re-looks” while observing the instrument A-scan display. Years of experience are then applied in interactive analysis of the A-scans for final resolution. For the particular area of concern, as much additional information as possible is collected (e.g., different angles and orientations) to provide information crucial to the final disposition. If the system collected the proper data and was capable of presenting these data in a meaningful format, this manual “re-look” procedure would not be necessary.