Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

Multiparameter methods have been used for a number of years to distinguish certain material properties from others that may be varying in the same eddy-current inspection. Usually the measured data are the magnitudes and phases of the eddy currents at several fixed frequencies. Alternatively, the necessary data can be obtained from pulsed eddy currents by measuring the pulse heights at various times or the times to reach various pulse heights. Such data can be used to analyze the pulse into various Fourier components, but that is time consuming and unnecessary. The raw data (for example, the pulse heights at various times) can be used as variables in polynomial approximations to the various properties in exactly the same way as has been used with the multifrequency, multiparameter method. This approach has several advantages, including simpler equipment, ability to use higher frequencies, and less modification required for different inspection problems.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Image Analysis, Signal Processing and AI

Section

Image Analysis and Signal Processing

Pages

849-854

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_97

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Multiparameter Methods with Pulsed Eddy Currents

La Jolla, CA

Multiparameter methods have been used for a number of years to distinguish certain material properties from others that may be varying in the same eddy-current inspection. Usually the measured data are the magnitudes and phases of the eddy currents at several fixed frequencies. Alternatively, the necessary data can be obtained from pulsed eddy currents by measuring the pulse heights at various times or the times to reach various pulse heights. Such data can be used to analyze the pulse into various Fourier components, but that is time consuming and unnecessary. The raw data (for example, the pulse heights at various times) can be used as variables in polynomial approximations to the various properties in exactly the same way as has been used with the multifrequency, multiparameter method. This approach has several advantages, including simpler equipment, ability to use higher frequencies, and less modification required for different inspection problems.