Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1988 12:00 AM

Description

Achieving reliable inspection of nuclear reactor components requires the development and proper field implementation, of a variety of ultrasonic techniques. Because of advances in ultrasonic technology and concerns with ever changing potential failure modes of aging reactors, new inspection techniques are constantly undergoing development and validation. The cost of a purely experimental approach to this process can be excessive due to sample fabrication, measurement and data interpretation, and destructive analysis. Consequently, research efforts have been aimed at the development and application of models which will help reduce those costs by providing theoretical guidance [1,2]. Reported here are the results of an experimental program which was undertaken with the goal of determining the accuracy of the models in predicting inspection results. Two models were considered. The first predicts the evolution of ultrasonic field patterns as a beam propagates from a transducer and into a component. The second predicts the ultrasonic inspection response of a branched crack, which is an idealization of an intergranular stress corrosion crack (IGSCC).

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

7B

Chapter

Chapter 8: NDE Systems and Reliability

Section

Reliability

Pages

1745-1752

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0979-6_106

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Experimental Validation of Models Applicable to the Ultrasonic Inspection of Nuclear Components

Williamsburg, VA

Achieving reliable inspection of nuclear reactor components requires the development and proper field implementation, of a variety of ultrasonic techniques. Because of advances in ultrasonic technology and concerns with ever changing potential failure modes of aging reactors, new inspection techniques are constantly undergoing development and validation. The cost of a purely experimental approach to this process can be excessive due to sample fabrication, measurement and data interpretation, and destructive analysis. Consequently, research efforts have been aimed at the development and application of models which will help reduce those costs by providing theoretical guidance [1,2]. Reported here are the results of an experimental program which was undertaken with the goal of determining the accuracy of the models in predicting inspection results. Two models were considered. The first predicts the evolution of ultrasonic field patterns as a beam propagates from a transducer and into a component. The second predicts the ultrasonic inspection response of a branched crack, which is an idealization of an intergranular stress corrosion crack (IGSCC).