Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1988 12:00 AM

Description

The validity of a nondestructive inspection method can be measured by two quantities, the probability that a given flaw size will be detected, and the probability that background noise will give rise to a false indication of the presence of a flaw. Unfortunately, experimental determination of the probability of detection (POD) and the probability of false alarm (PFA) requires a rather extensive set of measurements to obtain statistically sound estimates. Furthermore, if one or more of the parameters that define the method, such as the scan track spacing or probe configuration, are changed, then the full set of measurements must be repeated to obtain new estimates of the POD and PFA, thus adding to the time and expense of test validation. In some situations, where one is designing an inspection for a part or flaw size that is not yet available for testing, there is no way that the validity of a proposed inspection can be evaluated beforehand.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

7B

Chapter

Chapter 8: NDE Systems and Reliability

Section

Reliability

Pages

1753-1760

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0979-6_107

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Prediction of the Probability of Eddy Current Flaw Detection

Williamsburg, VA

The validity of a nondestructive inspection method can be measured by two quantities, the probability that a given flaw size will be detected, and the probability that background noise will give rise to a false indication of the presence of a flaw. Unfortunately, experimental determination of the probability of detection (POD) and the probability of false alarm (PFA) requires a rather extensive set of measurements to obtain statistically sound estimates. Furthermore, if one or more of the parameters that define the method, such as the scan track spacing or probe configuration, are changed, then the full set of measurements must be repeated to obtain new estimates of the POD and PFA, thus adding to the time and expense of test validation. In some situations, where one is designing an inspection for a part or flaw size that is not yet available for testing, there is no way that the validity of a proposed inspection can be evaluated beforehand.