Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1988 12:00 AM

Description

A composite is composed of several distinct material components, one of which is contiguous and forms a matrix. The overall properties of the composite material are some average of the properties of its components. The fiber reinforced composites, like the carbon-carbon composites, are heterogenous materials consisting of reinforcement fibers embedded in a matrix. In most cases, the matrix may be considered homogenous and isotropic, but not the fiber reinforcement, which are highly anisotropic fibers. These fibers are grouped into yarns and woven in specific directions. The thermal properties of the matrix and the fibers are usually different. Thermally, the fibers are more conductive than the matrix and play a dominant role in the heat transfer through the composite, especially when the heat flux is parallel to one of the fiber reinforcement directions. The complex nature and strong thermal anisotropy of the fiber reinforcement makes characterization and modeling of 3-D carbon-carbon composites very difficult. Recently, [1,2,3,4,5] using the flash method for measuring thermal diffusivity, the in-situ thermal properties of the constituents of composite materials were determined.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

7B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Adhesive Bonds and Composites

Section

Composites—Properties

Pages

979-985

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0979-6_12

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

QNDE of a 3-D Carbon-Carbon Composite Using Photoacoustic Microscopy

Williamsburg, VA

A composite is composed of several distinct material components, one of which is contiguous and forms a matrix. The overall properties of the composite material are some average of the properties of its components. The fiber reinforced composites, like the carbon-carbon composites, are heterogenous materials consisting of reinforcement fibers embedded in a matrix. In most cases, the matrix may be considered homogenous and isotropic, but not the fiber reinforcement, which are highly anisotropic fibers. These fibers are grouped into yarns and woven in specific directions. The thermal properties of the matrix and the fibers are usually different. Thermally, the fibers are more conductive than the matrix and play a dominant role in the heat transfer through the composite, especially when the heat flux is parallel to one of the fiber reinforcement directions. The complex nature and strong thermal anisotropy of the fiber reinforcement makes characterization and modeling of 3-D carbon-carbon composites very difficult. Recently, [1,2,3,4,5] using the flash method for measuring thermal diffusivity, the in-situ thermal properties of the constituents of composite materials were determined.