Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1988 12:00 AM

Description

Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is an effective method of evaluating various types of composite materials for defects such as porosity, resin rich areas, fiber misalignment and delaminations. This paper discusses the role ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation performed in studying the impact tolerance of composite materials. The composite specimens were ultrasonically inspected to determine their integrity before and after exposure to impact. Traditional low frequency (2.25 to 10 megahertz) C-scan techniques evaluated an assortment of large composite panels which were made of several organic matrix resins including thermosets and a thermoplastic. After specimens were cut from these panels an ultrasonic microscope scanned them for cutting damage. After the composite specimens were impact loaded, they were again ultrasonically scanned. From the images, the extent of the damage was calculated and compared with the impact level. A damaged composite specimen was sectioned and an end view of the damage was imaged with a scanning acoustic microscope. The composite specimens were also destructively analyzed, and the results were compared with the ultrasonic inspections.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

7B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Adhesive Bonds and Composites

Section

Composites—Properties

Pages

1003-1010

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0979-6_15

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Inspecting Advanced Composite Materials at Ultrasonic Frequencies from 2 Megahertz to 2 Gigahertz

Williamsburg, VA

Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is an effective method of evaluating various types of composite materials for defects such as porosity, resin rich areas, fiber misalignment and delaminations. This paper discusses the role ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation performed in studying the impact tolerance of composite materials. The composite specimens were ultrasonically inspected to determine their integrity before and after exposure to impact. Traditional low frequency (2.25 to 10 megahertz) C-scan techniques evaluated an assortment of large composite panels which were made of several organic matrix resins including thermosets and a thermoplastic. After specimens were cut from these panels an ultrasonic microscope scanned them for cutting damage. After the composite specimens were impact loaded, they were again ultrasonically scanned. From the images, the extent of the damage was calculated and compared with the impact level. A damaged composite specimen was sectioned and an end view of the damage was imaged with a scanning acoustic microscope. The composite specimens were also destructively analyzed, and the results were compared with the ultrasonic inspections.