Presenter Information

Daniel Guidotti, IBM

Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1988 12:00 AM

Description

The early work of Brattain and Bardeen [1] demonstrated that under illumination, a semiconductor surface develops a potential which can be measured with non-contact, capacitive coupling. Since then, the surface photo-voltage (PV) effect has received sporadic experimental as well as theoretical considerations. A number of experiments have been reported (with and without contacts) which make use of both dc and ac surface PV (see, for example, Ref. 5). In the latter form, the incident light is modulated at frequencies ranging from a few Hz to a few MHz. Both the dc and ac embodiments of the surface photo-voltage effect have been used to study various minority and majority carrier transport mechanisms in the presence of various degrees of inversion (or accumulation) of the semiconductor surface.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

7B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Electronic Materials and Devices

Pages

1167-1176

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0979-6_35

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Spatially Resolved Non-Contact Bulk and Surface Photovoltage Response in Semiconductors

Williamsburg, VA

The early work of Brattain and Bardeen [1] demonstrated that under illumination, a semiconductor surface develops a potential which can be measured with non-contact, capacitive coupling. Since then, the surface photo-voltage (PV) effect has received sporadic experimental as well as theoretical considerations. A number of experiments have been reported (with and without contacts) which make use of both dc and ac surface PV (see, for example, Ref. 5). In the latter form, the incident light is modulated at frequencies ranging from a few Hz to a few MHz. Both the dc and ac embodiments of the surface photo-voltage effect have been used to study various minority and majority carrier transport mechanisms in the presence of various degrees of inversion (or accumulation) of the semiconductor surface.