Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1988 12:00 AM

Description

There is an international research effort to incorporate ceramic components into hot sections of heat engines. A major portion of this effort is directed towards the understanding and control of ceramic processing so that the strength of ceramics may be optimized. To date, the strength of sintered ceramics (e.g., SiC) is well below, by about two orders of magnitude, the theoretical strength [1,4]. This discrepancy is understood to be due to the presence of voids, inclusions, agglomerates, and anomalously large grains [4]. These defects, causing premature failure, are introduced or formed during the ceramic manufacturing process. Considerable work has already been done to remove these strength reducing material variations. This has resulted in a steady increase in the fracture strength of ceramics; however, the rate of this increase has slowed. Adding to the problem is the fact that the fracture strength of identically produced experimental samples varies as much as 35 percent [2]. As a result of the loss of momentum toward higher strengths, researchers are turning to ceramic- ceramic fiber composites. These composites show promise of increasing the fracture strength of ceramic materials even further. It is likely that the same material strength variations will be present, at least locally in the matrix, in ceramic composites.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

7B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Characterization of Materials

Section

Properties

Pages

1237-1246

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0979-6_43

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Imaging Subtle Microstructural Variations in Ceramics with Precision Ultrasonic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements

Williamsburg, VA

There is an international research effort to incorporate ceramic components into hot sections of heat engines. A major portion of this effort is directed towards the understanding and control of ceramic processing so that the strength of ceramics may be optimized. To date, the strength of sintered ceramics (e.g., SiC) is well below, by about two orders of magnitude, the theoretical strength [1,4]. This discrepancy is understood to be due to the presence of voids, inclusions, agglomerates, and anomalously large grains [4]. These defects, causing premature failure, are introduced or formed during the ceramic manufacturing process. Considerable work has already been done to remove these strength reducing material variations. This has resulted in a steady increase in the fracture strength of ceramics; however, the rate of this increase has slowed. Adding to the problem is the fact that the fracture strength of identically produced experimental samples varies as much as 35 percent [2]. As a result of the loss of momentum toward higher strengths, researchers are turning to ceramic- ceramic fiber composites. These composites show promise of increasing the fracture strength of ceramic materials even further. It is likely that the same material strength variations will be present, at least locally in the matrix, in ceramic composites.