Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1988 12:00 AM

Description

In the simplest view solid state welding of metals occurs when intimate contact is achieved by clean metal surfaces. These two requirements, contact and cleanliness, are attained as a result of thermal diffusion and mechanical deformation. Not surprisingly, the bond plane defects of greatest concern are incomplete contact (porosity) and residual contamination. These are illustrated in Figure 1: (a) bondline pores in Ti-6V-4A1, with good bonding between the pores; and (b) intimate contact along the entire surface, but bonding impeded by contamination, in this example 304L stainless steel. For many diffusion bonds, both of these defects are found, and of course the amount and severity varies considerably. The work reported here is specifically directed towards characterizing the second type of defect, intimate contact achieved with a thin (less than one micron) contaminant layer impeding full metallurgical bonding.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

7B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Characterization of Materials

Section

Bonds and Interfaces

Pages

1319-1325

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0979-6_52

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Ultrasonic Non-Destructive Evaluation of Solid State Welds

Williamsburg, VA

In the simplest view solid state welding of metals occurs when intimate contact is achieved by clean metal surfaces. These two requirements, contact and cleanliness, are attained as a result of thermal diffusion and mechanical deformation. Not surprisingly, the bond plane defects of greatest concern are incomplete contact (porosity) and residual contamination. These are illustrated in Figure 1: (a) bondline pores in Ti-6V-4A1, with good bonding between the pores; and (b) intimate contact along the entire surface, but bonding impeded by contamination, in this example 304L stainless steel. For many diffusion bonds, both of these defects are found, and of course the amount and severity varies considerably. The work reported here is specifically directed towards characterizing the second type of defect, intimate contact achieved with a thin (less than one micron) contaminant layer impeding full metallurgical bonding.