Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1988 12:00 AM

Description

The new concept of acoustic waveguide cure monitoring of materials, such as resins and composites, has been described in detail in previous publications(1,2) which have included a large amount of experimental data. Basically, it has been established that the attenuation of acoustic waves transmitted through a waveguide embedded within a curing material reaches a maximum at gelation; and generally throughout the cure cycle, the degree of attenuation is closely linked to the material viscosity. Another important aspect is that as the waveguides remain in a material throughout its lifetime, then it is anticipated that they will be valuable as internal microphones for sensing internal stresses and strain, and as sensors for monitoring temperature and material properties. This means that for the acoustic waveguide technique, unlike other cure monitoring methods, there is a need to not only determine the cure characteristics, but to also understand the influence of the waveguides during the material lifetime.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

7B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Characterization of Materials

Section

Process Control

Pages

1549-1553

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0979-6_81

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Acoustic Characterization of Curing Processes Using Waveguides Embedded within Polymers

Williamsburg, VA

The new concept of acoustic waveguide cure monitoring of materials, such as resins and composites, has been described in detail in previous publications(1,2) which have included a large amount of experimental data. Basically, it has been established that the attenuation of acoustic waves transmitted through a waveguide embedded within a curing material reaches a maximum at gelation; and generally throughout the cure cycle, the degree of attenuation is closely linked to the material viscosity. Another important aspect is that as the waveguides remain in a material throughout its lifetime, then it is anticipated that they will be valuable as internal microphones for sensing internal stresses and strain, and as sensors for monitoring temperature and material properties. This means that for the acoustic waveguide technique, unlike other cure monitoring methods, there is a need to not only determine the cure characteristics, but to also understand the influence of the waveguides during the material lifetime.