Location

La Jolla ,CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

In order to have confidence in the nondestructive evaluation data generated by an ultrasonic system, it is important to establish the adequacy and reliability of the ultrasonic transducer employed in the system. This is usually accomplished by characterizing the electro-mechanical properties and the radiated acoustic field distribution of the transducer. The methodology for characterizing the electro-mechanical properties, including insertion loss, Q-factor, impulse and frequency spectrum, is well established and has been reported in the literature [1, 2]. Characterization of the acoustic field distribution involves determination of the beam diameter, propagation angle and axial and cross-sectional uniformity. The methods used for obtaining these field characteristics include the Schlieren [3], ball reflector [4] and hydrophone scanning [5]. Although these methods have been used effectively to characterize transducer fields, they do have some limitations. The Schlieren method requires elaborate optical set-ups and only yields the axial profile of the field distribution. The ball reflector and hydrophone methods are point-by-point scanning methods and therefore require complex scanning mechanisms and sophisticated electronic instrumentation for full characterization of the acoustic field.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

8A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Probes and Sensors

Section

Ultrasonic Transducer Models and Measurements

Pages

951-958

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_119

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Acoustographic Evaluation of Ultrasonic Transducers

La Jolla ,CA

In order to have confidence in the nondestructive evaluation data generated by an ultrasonic system, it is important to establish the adequacy and reliability of the ultrasonic transducer employed in the system. This is usually accomplished by characterizing the electro-mechanical properties and the radiated acoustic field distribution of the transducer. The methodology for characterizing the electro-mechanical properties, including insertion loss, Q-factor, impulse and frequency spectrum, is well established and has been reported in the literature [1, 2]. Characterization of the acoustic field distribution involves determination of the beam diameter, propagation angle and axial and cross-sectional uniformity. The methods used for obtaining these field characteristics include the Schlieren [3], ball reflector [4] and hydrophone scanning [5]. Although these methods have been used effectively to characterize transducer fields, they do have some limitations. The Schlieren method requires elaborate optical set-ups and only yields the axial profile of the field distribution. The ball reflector and hydrophone methods are point-by-point scanning methods and therefore require complex scanning mechanisms and sophisticated electronic instrumentation for full characterization of the acoustic field.