Location

La Jolla ,CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

Calibration procedures for eddy current inspections often involve the use of artifact standards containing manufactured flaws. The manufactured flaw is assumed to be a good approximation of the type of flaw being sought during the inspection. These manufactured flaws are most often produced by electrical discharge machining (EDM), milling, or the controlled growth of fatigue cracks. With simple amplitude display inspection equipment this type of artifact is usually sufficient, but as more sophisticated inspection equipment is developed some drawbacks to the commonly accepted practice are becoming evident. Instruments that are sensitive to eddy current signal phase as well as amplitude can show considerable differences in phase between a relatively wide EDM notch or milled slot and a real fatigue crack [1]. The use of controlled growth fatigue cracks can also cause problems when forces at the crack’s tip drive the crack faces together, making electrical contact [2], In addition, estimates of crack depth will always be estimates until the crack is broken apart. We describe here a technique for consistently producing well characterized discontinuities in aluminum which are not subject to these problems.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

8A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Probes and Sensors

Section

Eddy Current Probes

Pages

985-989

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_123

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Standard Flaws for Eddy Current Probe Characterization

La Jolla ,CA

Calibration procedures for eddy current inspections often involve the use of artifact standards containing manufactured flaws. The manufactured flaw is assumed to be a good approximation of the type of flaw being sought during the inspection. These manufactured flaws are most often produced by electrical discharge machining (EDM), milling, or the controlled growth of fatigue cracks. With simple amplitude display inspection equipment this type of artifact is usually sufficient, but as more sophisticated inspection equipment is developed some drawbacks to the commonly accepted practice are becoming evident. Instruments that are sensitive to eddy current signal phase as well as amplitude can show considerable differences in phase between a relatively wide EDM notch or milled slot and a real fatigue crack [1]. The use of controlled growth fatigue cracks can also cause problems when forces at the crack’s tip drive the crack faces together, making electrical contact [2], In addition, estimates of crack depth will always be estimates until the crack is broken apart. We describe here a technique for consistently producing well characterized discontinuities in aluminum which are not subject to these problems.