Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

Phase I of “Research on Intelligent Processing of Carbon-Carbon Composites” is a two year program to develop enabling technologies for real time control of the carbonization process for resin matrix composites. The research has three related foci: in situ material property sensors; process models; and intelligent control architecture. The research has, to date, 1) developed control strategies at three levels of sophistication that use sensors and models to complete carbonization more rapidly while still reducing losses; 2) developed a control architecture that integrates those sensors and models; 3) conducted successful in situ tests of chemical and physical property sensors; 4) developed a high temperature eddy current sensor (not yet tested in situ); 5) developed considerable kinetic data on the carbonization reactions, described the basic reaction paths and their relation to physical properties qualitatively, and developed a kinetic equation for the lowest temperature family of carbonization reactions, the production of water from hydroxyl groups; 6) defined the modeling strategy for calculating gas pressure and the experimental strategy for developing models for matrix strength. In the following, we describe the general problem and the issues in modeling and control to provide a context for the sensor results.

Volume

8B

Chapter

Minisymposium on Materials Processing

Pages

1185-1193

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_148

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Sensors for Carbonization Control

La Jolla, CA

Phase I of “Research on Intelligent Processing of Carbon-Carbon Composites” is a two year program to develop enabling technologies for real time control of the carbonization process for resin matrix composites. The research has three related foci: in situ material property sensors; process models; and intelligent control architecture. The research has, to date, 1) developed control strategies at three levels of sophistication that use sensors and models to complete carbonization more rapidly while still reducing losses; 2) developed a control architecture that integrates those sensors and models; 3) conducted successful in situ tests of chemical and physical property sensors; 4) developed a high temperature eddy current sensor (not yet tested in situ); 5) developed considerable kinetic data on the carbonization reactions, described the basic reaction paths and their relation to physical properties qualitatively, and developed a kinetic equation for the lowest temperature family of carbonization reactions, the production of water from hydroxyl groups; 6) defined the modeling strategy for calculating gas pressure and the experimental strategy for developing models for matrix strength. In the following, we describe the general problem and the issues in modeling and control to provide a context for the sensor results.