Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

Dynamic Imaging Microellipsometry (DIM) is a rapid, high resolution, full-field imaging ellipsometric technique previously described [1, 2]. Development and characterization has advanced through the construction and testing of the semi-automated, second DIM system. Several improvements in the system’s design have been implemented, but the basic approach of combining an optical system derived from conventional ellipsometry with video and image processing has been retained. The first DIM system used a Polarizer, Compensator, Specimen, and Analyzer (PCSA) optical system. The current instrument has undergone modification into a Polarizer, Half waveplate, Specimen, Compensator, and Analyzer (PHSCA) configuration. The polarization rotation is now under direct computer control enabling automated operation that greatly facilitates statistical analysis of the instrument’s response. Finally, high quality metallic and silicon samples have been studied, refining the previous estimates of the systems accuracy, noise and spatial resolution.

Volume

8B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Electronic Materials and Devices

Section

Electronic Materials and Devices

Pages

1219-1226

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_152

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Nondestructive Mapping of Surface Film Parameters with Dynamic Imaging Microellipsometry

La Jolla, CA

Dynamic Imaging Microellipsometry (DIM) is a rapid, high resolution, full-field imaging ellipsometric technique previously described [1, 2]. Development and characterization has advanced through the construction and testing of the semi-automated, second DIM system. Several improvements in the system’s design have been implemented, but the basic approach of combining an optical system derived from conventional ellipsometry with video and image processing has been retained. The first DIM system used a Polarizer, Compensator, Specimen, and Analyzer (PCSA) optical system. The current instrument has undergone modification into a Polarizer, Half waveplate, Specimen, Compensator, and Analyzer (PHSCA) configuration. The polarization rotation is now under direct computer control enabling automated operation that greatly facilitates statistical analysis of the instrument’s response. Finally, high quality metallic and silicon samples have been studied, refining the previous estimates of the systems accuracy, noise and spatial resolution.