Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

The desired static performance and dynamic adaptability of advanced structural materials demands the development of intrinsic analysis and control systems which are capable of independently optimizing structural properties in response to particular external disturbances. Materials and structures which incorporate environmental and material sensors, mechanical actuators, and electronic signal processing and adaptive control systems to produce either appropriate readouts or actuator responses for particular sensor inputs have been termed “smart”, “intelligent”, “sense-able” or “organic” during the past several years [1]. The primary advantage of such materials and structures is that they may be designed to adapt to a wide range of conditions during their normal use lifetimes. Some types of sensors and actuators, particularly small and lightweight optical fiber sensors and shape memory metal actuators, may be directly embedded without seriously affecting material integrity. Additionally, the optical fibers embedded in such material systems may be used as life cycle sensors to monitor nondestructively the way in which composite and metal structures are fabricated, the inservice lifetime performance conditions of the material, and the onset of material degradation due to a variety of causes including fatigue and impact damage [2].

Volume

8B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Engineered Materials

Section

"Smart" Structures

Pages

1443-1450

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_181

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Intelligent Structures Research at Virginia Tech

La Jolla, CA

The desired static performance and dynamic adaptability of advanced structural materials demands the development of intrinsic analysis and control systems which are capable of independently optimizing structural properties in response to particular external disturbances. Materials and structures which incorporate environmental and material sensors, mechanical actuators, and electronic signal processing and adaptive control systems to produce either appropriate readouts or actuator responses for particular sensor inputs have been termed “smart”, “intelligent”, “sense-able” or “organic” during the past several years [1]. The primary advantage of such materials and structures is that they may be designed to adapt to a wide range of conditions during their normal use lifetimes. Some types of sensors and actuators, particularly small and lightweight optical fiber sensors and shape memory metal actuators, may be directly embedded without seriously affecting material integrity. Additionally, the optical fibers embedded in such material systems may be used as life cycle sensors to monitor nondestructively the way in which composite and metal structures are fabricated, the inservice lifetime performance conditions of the material, and the onset of material degradation due to a variety of causes including fatigue and impact damage [2].