Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

With increasing demand in industry to produce solid-solid bonds, the need for their quantitative characterization, particularly with respect to their strength, becomes more urgent. In the present paper, restricted to diffusion bonds in metallic systems, we define strength as the ultimate engineering stress achieved in a uniaxial tensile test at slow strain rate. It is assumed that the reduction of strength is basically determined by a lack of metallic bonding over a fraction of the total area to be bonded, with metallically bonded areas being separated by crack-shaped voids. In the present paper, these voids are considered to contain a vacuum or, at most, a low pressure gas. In principle, they could be filled with some form of a solid contaminant (oxide, e.g.) which increases the complexity of the analysis[1]. Furthermore, the present paper concentrates on a situation where self-diffusion, necessary to achieve bonding, is the only metallurgical effect considered. Any phase transformations, precipitate reactions and grain growth during the bonding process are ignored. In addition, the materials on either side of the bond are identical.

Volume

8B

Chapter

Chapter 9: Characterization of Materials

Section

Solid-State Bonds and Joints

Pages

1949-1956

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_247

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Nondestructive Characterization and Bond Strength of Solid-Solid Bonds

La Jolla, CA

With increasing demand in industry to produce solid-solid bonds, the need for their quantitative characterization, particularly with respect to their strength, becomes more urgent. In the present paper, restricted to diffusion bonds in metallic systems, we define strength as the ultimate engineering stress achieved in a uniaxial tensile test at slow strain rate. It is assumed that the reduction of strength is basically determined by a lack of metallic bonding over a fraction of the total area to be bonded, with metallically bonded areas being separated by crack-shaped voids. In the present paper, these voids are considered to contain a vacuum or, at most, a low pressure gas. In principle, they could be filled with some form of a solid contaminant (oxide, e.g.) which increases the complexity of the analysis[1]. Furthermore, the present paper concentrates on a situation where self-diffusion, necessary to achieve bonding, is the only metallurgical effect considered. Any phase transformations, precipitate reactions and grain growth during the bonding process are ignored. In addition, the materials on either side of the bond are identical.