Location

La Jolla ,CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

The eddy-current (EC) NDE method has been in use for quite some time, and efforts have been made to make it a fully quantitative method. To evaluate impedance signals for a given EC inspection system, one has to characterize the system as a whole, including both probes and specimens. In particular, until probes are characterized, the electromagnetic fields cannot be calculated. Naturally, the amount of numerical computation becomes a serious issue during the course of development. It is necessary to choose probes carefully so as to maximize the flaw-characterization capability, while keeping numerical tasks within a reasonable size. Probes that are suitable for quantitative assessment are presumably different in nature from those with maximum detection capability. Among all kinds of existing probes, the simplest characterizable probe is the uniform-field-eddy-current (UFEC) probe. In fact, a series of studies, both theoretical and experimental, were devoted to demonstrating potential capabilities of UFEC probes [1–9]. The present theoretical work is another entry in this series. The numerical procedure developed in this work is limited to the case where cracks are tightly closed. The procedure is nevertheless capable, in principle, of dealing with an arbitrary range of frequencies.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

8A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Classic Techniques

Section

Eddy Currents

Pages

245-250

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_31

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Eddy-Current Detection Methods for Surface-Breaking Tight Cracks

La Jolla ,CA

The eddy-current (EC) NDE method has been in use for quite some time, and efforts have been made to make it a fully quantitative method. To evaluate impedance signals for a given EC inspection system, one has to characterize the system as a whole, including both probes and specimens. In particular, until probes are characterized, the electromagnetic fields cannot be calculated. Naturally, the amount of numerical computation becomes a serious issue during the course of development. It is necessary to choose probes carefully so as to maximize the flaw-characterization capability, while keeping numerical tasks within a reasonable size. Probes that are suitable for quantitative assessment are presumably different in nature from those with maximum detection capability. Among all kinds of existing probes, the simplest characterizable probe is the uniform-field-eddy-current (UFEC) probe. In fact, a series of studies, both theoretical and experimental, were devoted to demonstrating potential capabilities of UFEC probes [1–9]. The present theoretical work is another entry in this series. The numerical procedure developed in this work is limited to the case where cracks are tightly closed. The procedure is nevertheless capable, in principle, of dealing with an arbitrary range of frequencies.