Location

La Jolla ,CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

The demands on our nondestructive evaluation techniques are increasing every year as our technical society becomes more and more complex. Rapid, accurate, and cheap inspection methods are needed to insure the safety, reliability, and economy of large power systems, transportation systems, and many gadgets on which our society has become dependent. Eddy-current tests have the required speed and the potential for the required accuracy and low cost. However, because of their complex nature, it has been costly to design these tests and interpret the data. To design more sensitive tests we need to be able to accurately compute the change in the eddy-current signal caused by a defect (the “forward” problem) in the presence of all of the other properties in the test. Then, to evaluate the data from the test we need to compute the defect size and location from the change in the eddy-current signal (the “inverse” problem) in the presence of the other property variations.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

8A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Classic Techniques

Section

Eddy Currents

Pages

305-312

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_39

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Eddy-Current Inversion of Flaw Data From Flat-Bottomed Holes

La Jolla ,CA

The demands on our nondestructive evaluation techniques are increasing every year as our technical society becomes more and more complex. Rapid, accurate, and cheap inspection methods are needed to insure the safety, reliability, and economy of large power systems, transportation systems, and many gadgets on which our society has become dependent. Eddy-current tests have the required speed and the potential for the required accuracy and low cost. However, because of their complex nature, it has been costly to design these tests and interpret the data. To design more sensitive tests we need to be able to accurately compute the change in the eddy-current signal caused by a defect (the “forward” problem) in the presence of all of the other properties in the test. Then, to evaluate the data from the test we need to compute the defect size and location from the change in the eddy-current signal (the “inverse” problem) in the presence of the other property variations.