Location

La Jolla ,CA

Start Date

1-1-1989 12:00 AM

Description

Laminography is used to separate overlying structures by focusing on various planes or surfaces in the object. This has typically been performed using film as the imaging medium. In medical laminography, also referred to as conventional tomography, the x-ray source and film are in motion during the exposure, pivoting about a plane in the object. Details within that plane are in focus in the final film exposure; in contrast, details in planes above and below the pivot plane are blurred. However, this technique requires a new exposure for each plane to be examined, and complicated mechanical arrangements are employed to pivot the x-ray source and film cassette correctly. Digital laminography, on the other hand, uses multiple digital projection images taken statically through the object tilted at discrete angles. These images are then backprojected and combined to focus on a particular depth. The advantage of digital laminography is that the same data can be used to reconstruct many different planes. Thus one can scroll through different depths in the object to determine the variation of structure with depth. In addition, the object manipulation is much simpler than the source/detector pivoting required in conventional laminography.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

8A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Advanced Techniques

Section

X-Ray Computed Tomography

Pages

457-464

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-0817-1_58

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Laminographic Reconstruction from Real-Time Radiographic Images

La Jolla ,CA

Laminography is used to separate overlying structures by focusing on various planes or surfaces in the object. This has typically been performed using film as the imaging medium. In medical laminography, also referred to as conventional tomography, the x-ray source and film are in motion during the exposure, pivoting about a plane in the object. Details within that plane are in focus in the final film exposure; in contrast, details in planes above and below the pivot plane are blurred. However, this technique requires a new exposure for each plane to be examined, and complicated mechanical arrangements are employed to pivot the x-ray source and film cassette correctly. Digital laminography, on the other hand, uses multiple digital projection images taken statically through the object tilted at discrete angles. These images are then backprojected and combined to focus on a particular depth. The advantage of digital laminography is that the same data can be used to reconstruct many different planes. Thus one can scroll through different depths in the object to determine the variation of structure with depth. In addition, the object manipulation is much simpler than the source/detector pivoting required in conventional laminography.