Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1990 12:00 AM

Description

The mechanical properties of adhesive joints depend on: 1) the bulk (cohesive) properties of the adhesive such as type of adhesive, degree of cure, porosity, et cetera and 2) the interphasial properties of the bond between the adhesive and the adherends. While several techniques have been developed for nondestructive evaluation of cohesive properties of the adhesive, the assessment of interphase properties is more complicated. It has been previously proposed [1] that an ultrasonic wave that produces shear stresses on the interphase is sensitive to its properties. This may be achieved by utilization of interface waves [1,2] or guided waves in the bonded plates [3,4,5]. Another possibility is the use of obliquely incident ultrasonic waves for interphase evaluation, analyzing signals in time or frequency domains [6,7,8].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

9B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Engineered Materials

Section

Adhesive Joints

Pages

1231-1238

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4684-5772-8_158

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Ultrasonic Evaluation of Interphasial Properties in Adhesive Joints

Brunswick, ME

The mechanical properties of adhesive joints depend on: 1) the bulk (cohesive) properties of the adhesive such as type of adhesive, degree of cure, porosity, et cetera and 2) the interphasial properties of the bond between the adhesive and the adherends. While several techniques have been developed for nondestructive evaluation of cohesive properties of the adhesive, the assessment of interphase properties is more complicated. It has been previously proposed [1] that an ultrasonic wave that produces shear stresses on the interphase is sensitive to its properties. This may be achieved by utilization of interface waves [1,2] or guided waves in the bonded plates [3,4,5]. Another possibility is the use of obliquely incident ultrasonic waves for interphase evaluation, analyzing signals in time or frequency domains [6,7,8].