Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1990 12:00 AM

Description

Materials characterization exemplifies quantitative NDE because it demands quantitative measurements of basic physical properties and quantitative theoretical models that relate the physical properties to the service requirements. One of the most important applications of quantitative NDE is the prediction of mechanical strength of a structural material from measurements that do not mechanically deform it. This can only be accomplished through an understanding of the microstructural sources of strengthening followed by carefully designed measurements of those physical properties that reflect the key microstructures. An examination of the content of this volume shows many papers devoted to predicting hardness, strength, drawability and residual stresses from physical property measurements that can be made nondestructively under field conditions. Most of these papers conclude that more accurate predictions can be made if more than one physical property is measured because the correlations observed are limited in the range of alloys and heat treatments over which reliable results can be obtained.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

9B

Chapter

Chapter 8: Characterization of Materials

Section

Properties

Pages

1557-1564

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4684-5772-8_200

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Elastic and Magnetic Characterization of Metals from One Surface

Brunswick, ME

Materials characterization exemplifies quantitative NDE because it demands quantitative measurements of basic physical properties and quantitative theoretical models that relate the physical properties to the service requirements. One of the most important applications of quantitative NDE is the prediction of mechanical strength of a structural material from measurements that do not mechanically deform it. This can only be accomplished through an understanding of the microstructural sources of strengthening followed by carefully designed measurements of those physical properties that reflect the key microstructures. An examination of the content of this volume shows many papers devoted to predicting hardness, strength, drawability and residual stresses from physical property measurements that can be made nondestructively under field conditions. Most of these papers conclude that more accurate predictions can be made if more than one physical property is measured because the correlations observed are limited in the range of alloys and heat treatments over which reliable results can be obtained.