Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1990 12:00 AM

Description

Embrittlement of Zr−2.5%Nb pressure tubes from CANDU nuclear reactors has recently become a concern in the Canadian nuclear industry. While a full understanding of the mechanisms involved has not yet been achieved, it is known that hydrogen/deuterium, liberated through oxidization of the tube’s inner surface, is absorbed into the metal where it eventually precipitates out as weak, brittle hydride platelets. Knowledge of the nature and extent of oxide formation may thus give indications about the degree of hydrogen uptake and embrittlement in the tubes. In particular, a reliable, nondestructive technique for determining the thickness and integrity of these oxide layers is needed. Theoretically, such an evaluation is possible using ultrasonic spectroscopy.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

9B

Chapter

Chapter 8: Characterization of Materials

Section

Properties

Pages

1645-1652

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4684-5772-8_212

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

High-Frequency Ultrasonic Characterization of ZrO2 Layer Thicknesses Using Digital Spectral Analysis

Brunswick, ME

Embrittlement of Zr−2.5%Nb pressure tubes from CANDU nuclear reactors has recently become a concern in the Canadian nuclear industry. While a full understanding of the mechanisms involved has not yet been achieved, it is known that hydrogen/deuterium, liberated through oxidization of the tube’s inner surface, is absorbed into the metal where it eventually precipitates out as weak, brittle hydride platelets. Knowledge of the nature and extent of oxide formation may thus give indications about the degree of hydrogen uptake and embrittlement in the tubes. In particular, a reliable, nondestructive technique for determining the thickness and integrity of these oxide layers is needed. Theoretically, such an evaluation is possible using ultrasonic spectroscopy.