Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1990 12:00 AM

Description

Scattering characteristics have been calculated for a spherical inclusion with partially debonded interphase conditions. Three scattering characteristics of the scattered field have been selected for investigation: 1) the frequency response at a fixed point, 2) the scattered field at a fixed frequency along an observation line, and 3) the radiation pattern. The compliant interphase between the inclusion and the surrounding elastic matrix has been modeled by a layer of distributed springs which offers resistance to relative displacements in the two tangent and the normal directions. Two basic assumptions are made for the spring model of the interphase: 1) The springs are linear, and 2) The interphase is very thin so that the effect of inertia of the interphase can be neglected. These assumptions are acceptable in the low frequency range. The partial debonding of the interphase is modeled by setting the spring constants (defined per unit area) equal to zero along part of the interphase.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

9A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Classical Techniques

Section

A: Elastic Wave Scattering and Flaw Sizing

Pages

69-76

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4684-5772-8_7

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Scattering Characteristics of a Partially Debonded Compliant Inclusion-Matrix Interphase

Brunswick, ME

Scattering characteristics have been calculated for a spherical inclusion with partially debonded interphase conditions. Three scattering characteristics of the scattered field have been selected for investigation: 1) the frequency response at a fixed point, 2) the scattered field at a fixed frequency along an observation line, and 3) the radiation pattern. The compliant interphase between the inclusion and the surrounding elastic matrix has been modeled by a layer of distributed springs which offers resistance to relative displacements in the two tangent and the normal directions. Two basic assumptions are made for the spring model of the interphase: 1) The springs are linear, and 2) The interphase is very thin so that the effect of inertia of the interphase can be neglected. These assumptions are acceptable in the low frequency range. The partial debonding of the interphase is modeled by setting the spring constants (defined per unit area) equal to zero along part of the interphase.