Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1991 12:00 AM

Description

A fiber optic vibration and strain sensor described by Rogowski et al [1] implemented a radio frequency (rf) phase locked loop in an optical strain gauge bonded to or embedded in a composite structure. A laser is modulated at radio frequency by a voltage controlled oscillator. The phase delay through the optical fiber transmission line is compared to the source oscillator, and the resulting error signal shifts the oscillator, locking the phase. Strain in the specimen (a composite panel) produces a change in optical phase length in the fiber. Tracking the frequency change gives a measure of the integrated strain transduced into the fiber from the strained panel. Strain level sensitivity on the order of 0.1 microstrains has been reported [1]. However, considerable confusion surrounds the performance of the reported sensor, since noise presumed to arise from cladding/core mode interference and splice reflections makes significant filtering necessary, reducing the bandwidth of the sensor, e.g., increasing the response time to detect strains [2]. This limits vibration control applications.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

10B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Engineered Materials

Section

Smart Structures

Pages

1239-1245

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3742-7_14

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

A Fiber Optic RF Resonant Cavity Sensor for Strain Sensing-Forrcs

La Jolla, CA

A fiber optic vibration and strain sensor described by Rogowski et al [1] implemented a radio frequency (rf) phase locked loop in an optical strain gauge bonded to or embedded in a composite structure. A laser is modulated at radio frequency by a voltage controlled oscillator. The phase delay through the optical fiber transmission line is compared to the source oscillator, and the resulting error signal shifts the oscillator, locking the phase. Strain in the specimen (a composite panel) produces a change in optical phase length in the fiber. Tracking the frequency change gives a measure of the integrated strain transduced into the fiber from the strained panel. Strain level sensitivity on the order of 0.1 microstrains has been reported [1]. However, considerable confusion surrounds the performance of the reported sensor, since noise presumed to arise from cladding/core mode interference and splice reflections makes significant filtering necessary, reducing the bandwidth of the sensor, e.g., increasing the response time to detect strains [2]. This limits vibration control applications.