Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1991 12:00 AM

Description

Vibration isolation is frequently accomplished by placing rubber pads between a structure and its foundation. In typical industrial situations, the weight of the structure can be used to keep the pads in place and to ensure contact at the interface. However, when dampers are used for small electronic components, they are frequently glued to the component and to the support. The total unit then consists of the component, a glue interface, the rubber damper, a second glue interface, and the foundation. If the interfaces fail, compressive waves can usually be transmitted, but tensile stress waves encounter the separated layer which markedly affects the transmissivity and damping. Consequently, the damper effectiveness generally is reduced. Many modern dampers employ viscoelastic rubber whose frequency characteristics and damping rely less upon resonance than upon the wide frequency spectrum of damping [1].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

10B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Engineered Materials

Section

Joints

Pages

1327-1333

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3742-7_25

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Manufacturing Commons

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Sonic Inspection of Bonds in Viscoelastic Composites

La Jolla, CA

Vibration isolation is frequently accomplished by placing rubber pads between a structure and its foundation. In typical industrial situations, the weight of the structure can be used to keep the pads in place and to ensure contact at the interface. However, when dampers are used for small electronic components, they are frequently glued to the component and to the support. The total unit then consists of the component, a glue interface, the rubber damper, a second glue interface, and the foundation. If the interfaces fail, compressive waves can usually be transmitted, but tensile stress waves encounter the separated layer which markedly affects the transmissivity and damping. Consequently, the damper effectiveness generally is reduced. Many modern dampers employ viscoelastic rubber whose frequency characteristics and damping rely less upon resonance than upon the wide frequency spectrum of damping [1].