Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1991 12:00 AM

Description

The physical behavior of components manufactured from polycrystalline materials is in many cases directly dependent on the porosity fraction (volume fraction of pores). As examples concerning key properties of technologically-important materials, porosity fraction has been shown to affect (1) the strength, toughness and modulus of structural and refractory materials such as Steel [1], Tungsten [2], SiC [3], Si3N4 [3], and Al2O3 [3], (2) the strength of nuclear fuel materials such as UO2 [4–5]. (3) the thermal shock behavior and strength of porcelain-based ceramics [6–7], (4) the dielectric and elastic properties of piezoelectric materials such as PZT [8], and (5) the critical current density, diamagnetic response, and modulus of superconducting ceramics such as YBa2Cu3O7−x [9–11]. In such cases where physical properties are directly dependent on porosity fraction, the measurement of porosity fraction becomes important in the quality assurance process for the material.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

10B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Characterization of Materials

Section

Properties

Pages

1663-1680

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3742-7_80

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Review and Statistical Analysis of the use of Ultrasonic Velocity for Estimating the Porosity Fraction in Polycrystalline Materials

La Jolla, CA

The physical behavior of components manufactured from polycrystalline materials is in many cases directly dependent on the porosity fraction (volume fraction of pores). As examples concerning key properties of technologically-important materials, porosity fraction has been shown to affect (1) the strength, toughness and modulus of structural and refractory materials such as Steel [1], Tungsten [2], SiC [3], Si3N4 [3], and Al2O3 [3], (2) the strength of nuclear fuel materials such as UO2 [4–5]. (3) the thermal shock behavior and strength of porcelain-based ceramics [6–7], (4) the dielectric and elastic properties of piezoelectric materials such as PZT [8], and (5) the critical current density, diamagnetic response, and modulus of superconducting ceramics such as YBa2Cu3O7−x [9–11]. In such cases where physical properties are directly dependent on porosity fraction, the measurement of porosity fraction becomes important in the quality assurance process for the material.