Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1991 12:00 AM

Description

In this paper we discuss the recent results of our infrared thermal wave studies of plasma-sprayed coatings, coatings on automotive metal panels, and metal to polymer adhesive joints. The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable NDE technique to assess the quality and test the integrity of these coatings and bonding. The experimental method is a pulsed heating and synchronous infrared thermal wave detection technique commonly referred to as box-car thermal wave video imaging. [1–3] The thermal wave propagation times for plasma-sprayed coatings and adhesive bonds are usually long enough for many NDE applications that the method used here can be considered to be a real time technique. In the IR thermal wave imaging method (Fig. 1) the sample surface is pulse-heated by a bank of flash lamps, and the thermal response of the surface is monitored as a function of time and space by means of an infrared video camera. The resulting video signal is sent to a fast signal processing system and averaged synchronously on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The final data are displayed in the form of 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional gray scale or pseudocolor images of subsurface thermal features.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

10B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Electronic and Ceramic Materials

Pages

1201-1206

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3742-7_9

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Infrared Thermal Wave Studies of Coated Surfaces

La Jolla, CA

In this paper we discuss the recent results of our infrared thermal wave studies of plasma-sprayed coatings, coatings on automotive metal panels, and metal to polymer adhesive joints. The purpose of this study is to develop a reliable NDE technique to assess the quality and test the integrity of these coatings and bonding. The experimental method is a pulsed heating and synchronous infrared thermal wave detection technique commonly referred to as box-car thermal wave video imaging. [1–3] The thermal wave propagation times for plasma-sprayed coatings and adhesive bonds are usually long enough for many NDE applications that the method used here can be considered to be a real time technique. In the IR thermal wave imaging method (Fig. 1) the sample surface is pulse-heated by a bank of flash lamps, and the thermal response of the surface is monitored as a function of time and space by means of an infrared video camera. The resulting video signal is sent to a fast signal processing system and averaged synchronously on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The final data are displayed in the form of 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional gray scale or pseudocolor images of subsurface thermal features.