Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

High temperature components made of metal/intermetallic and ceramic powders are increasingly being produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). In a typical HIPing process, powder is first packed in a thin-walled can of the desired shape, and placed in a furnace within a pressure vessel. Gas pressure is then applied, and the temperature raised. Powder is softened because of high temperature, and densification occurs by a combination of plasticity, power law creep and diffusional flow. Ideally, components with a uniform density distribution are sought, but in practice this sometimes is not achieved. Under some conditions powder near the hotter outer can surface densifies faster than the cooler interior, forming a denser outer skin that shields inner powder from pressure. Li, Ashby and Easterling have analyzed the mechanism in detail and interested readers are referred to (1).

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 3: Interpretive Signal Processing and Image Reconstruction

Section

Imaging and Inversion Techniques

Pages

789-796

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_101

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Reconstruction of Internal Density Distributions in Porous Bodies from Laser Ultrasonic Data

Brunswick, ME

High temperature components made of metal/intermetallic and ceramic powders are increasingly being produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). In a typical HIPing process, powder is first packed in a thin-walled can of the desired shape, and placed in a furnace within a pressure vessel. Gas pressure is then applied, and the temperature raised. Powder is softened because of high temperature, and densification occurs by a combination of plasticity, power law creep and diffusional flow. Ideally, components with a uniform density distribution are sought, but in practice this sometimes is not achieved. Under some conditions powder near the hotter outer can surface densifies faster than the cooler interior, forming a denser outer skin that shields inner powder from pressure. Li, Ashby and Easterling have analyzed the mechanism in detail and interested readers are referred to (1).