Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

A common problem in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is the limitation imposed by the oscillatory nature of the ultrasonic pulse. Echoes from closely spaced reflectors often overlap and interfere, obscuring the true nature of the defect or layered system. Many deconvolution methods have been developed to remove the oscillatory response of the transducer from the received ultrasonic echo thereby improving the temporal resolution. While these methods have worked well on simulated signals, the results on real data have generally been much poorer [1-7]. Ultrasonic pulse shape variations, nonlinear effects or the breakdown of other model assumptions all contribute to this lower performance on real signals. An additional problem which has undergone little investigation is temporal leakage; it is very common and produces inaccuracy in the position and amplitude of deconvolved features. An understanding of its nature may help to improve resolution when deconvolving real signals

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 3: Interpretive Signal Processing and Image Reconstruction

Section

Signal Processing

Pages

911-918

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_117

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Temporal Leakage and Its Effects on Resolution in Deconvolution of Ultrasonic Signals

Brunswick, ME

A common problem in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is the limitation imposed by the oscillatory nature of the ultrasonic pulse. Echoes from closely spaced reflectors often overlap and interfere, obscuring the true nature of the defect or layered system. Many deconvolution methods have been developed to remove the oscillatory response of the transducer from the received ultrasonic echo thereby improving the temporal resolution. While these methods have worked well on simulated signals, the results on real data have generally been much poorer [1-7]. Ultrasonic pulse shape variations, nonlinear effects or the breakdown of other model assumptions all contribute to this lower performance on real signals. An additional problem which has undergone little investigation is temporal leakage; it is very common and produces inaccuracy in the position and amplitude of deconvolved features. An understanding of its nature may help to improve resolution when deconvolving real signals