Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

Most of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) work using ultrasonic waves generally involves detection and sizing of flaws (e.g., cracks, voids, etc.), and analysis of waves scattering from boundaries with different elastic properties inside a material. Alignment of the ultrasonic measuring system by maximizing the amplitude of the received signal is adequate for these measurements. For characterization of the material properties, one must determine the elastic constants of the material. If the material is anisotropic (e.g., composites), assuming orthorhombic symmetry, one needs a complete set of 9 elastic constants for the characterization.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Sensors and Standards

Section

Acoustic and Ultrasonic Sensors

Pages

1005-1012

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_129

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Procedure for the Alignment of an Ultrasonic Beam for Nondestructive Applications

Brunswick, ME

Most of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) work using ultrasonic waves generally involves detection and sizing of flaws (e.g., cracks, voids, etc.), and analysis of waves scattering from boundaries with different elastic properties inside a material. Alignment of the ultrasonic measuring system by maximizing the amplitude of the received signal is adequate for these measurements. For characterization of the material properties, one must determine the elastic constants of the material. If the material is anisotropic (e.g., composites), assuming orthorhombic symmetry, one needs a complete set of 9 elastic constants for the characterization.