Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

The condition of an interface through which an ultrasonic wave passes as it enters a material is an important factor in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation. Most modeling studies of ultrasonic inspection assume that this interface is smooth. However, in real life this may not be the case. In the case of nuclear reactor components, factors such as weld overlay, claddings, grinding and diametrical shrink can give part surfaces a wavy, corrugated or abruptly stepped topography. M. S. Good [1] has provided some estimate of what surface conditions exist in nuclear reactor components, with some examples being illustrated in Fig. 1. These irregular surfaces can severely distort or redirect the ultrasonic beam, leading to false indications of size and location of defects.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Standard Techniques

Section

Elastic Wave Propagation

Pages

161-168

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_20

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Ultrasonic Wave Propagation through an Interface with a Step Discontinuity

Brunswick, ME

The condition of an interface through which an ultrasonic wave passes as it enters a material is an important factor in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation. Most modeling studies of ultrasonic inspection assume that this interface is smooth. However, in real life this may not be the case. In the case of nuclear reactor components, factors such as weld overlay, claddings, grinding and diametrical shrink can give part surfaces a wavy, corrugated or abruptly stepped topography. M. S. Good [1] has provided some estimate of what surface conditions exist in nuclear reactor components, with some examples being illustrated in Fig. 1. These irregular surfaces can severely distort or redirect the ultrasonic beam, leading to false indications of size and location of defects.