Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

The purpose of this paper is to report on the development of an eddy current (EC) measurement model applicable to corner crack inspections. Naturally, corner cracks are more difficult to detect than those on flat surfaces, because the specimen edge itself gives a large response to the EC probe. The flaw signal, if any, tends to be obscured by the large edge signal. Thus, probe impedance should be determined more accurately than usual in order to extract flaw signals out of the background. Experimentally, this requires high-accuracy impedance measurements with rigid control over probe motion. In modeling point of view, this means that predictions should be made from an exact model, or at least from a model which can achieve the required level of accuracy [1–3].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Standard Techniques

Section

Eddy Currents

Pages

233-240

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_29

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Eddy Current Corner Crack Inspection

Brunswick, ME

The purpose of this paper is to report on the development of an eddy current (EC) measurement model applicable to corner crack inspections. Naturally, corner cracks are more difficult to detect than those on flat surfaces, because the specimen edge itself gives a large response to the EC probe. The flaw signal, if any, tends to be obscured by the large edge signal. Thus, probe impedance should be determined more accurately than usual in order to extract flaw signals out of the background. Experimentally, this requires high-accuracy impedance measurements with rigid control over probe motion. In modeling point of view, this means that predictions should be made from an exact model, or at least from a model which can achieve the required level of accuracy [1–3].