Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

Eddy current measurement of electrical resistivity provides a method of sensing temperature during metals processing, thus offering a method of feedback control [1,2]. This method assumes a known resistivity-temperature relation for the alloy being processed. However, in many common processing configurations a measurement of the impedance of the coil system can depend on the velocity of the product being tested. In the through-transmission (abbreviated thru-trans) configuration for monitoring moving metallic sheets, the component of the exciting magnetic field normal to the sheet induces an electric field in the sheet transverse to the direction of the velocity. This modifies the induced current distribution and thus changes the shielding of the field at the receiver coil relative to the condition for the static case. This effect is significant even in the case of extruded aluminum moving at 150 ft/min. In high speed rolling, at 1000 ft/min or greater, the effect of velocity is even more significant.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Standard Techniques

Section

Eddy Currents

Pages

249-255

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_31

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Through-Transmission Impedance Measurements on Moving Metallic Sheets

Brunswick, ME

Eddy current measurement of electrical resistivity provides a method of sensing temperature during metals processing, thus offering a method of feedback control [1,2]. This method assumes a known resistivity-temperature relation for the alloy being processed. However, in many common processing configurations a measurement of the impedance of the coil system can depend on the velocity of the product being tested. In the through-transmission (abbreviated thru-trans) configuration for monitoring moving metallic sheets, the component of the exciting magnetic field normal to the sheet induces an electric field in the sheet transverse to the direction of the velocity. This modifies the induced current distribution and thus changes the shielding of the field at the receiver coil relative to the condition for the static case. This effect is significant even in the case of extruded aluminum moving at 150 ft/min. In high speed rolling, at 1000 ft/min or greater, the effect of velocity is even more significant.