Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

Recently 3-D cone-beam tomography has become of interest for the nondestructive evaluation of advanced materials. The main field of application in nondestructive testing is the evaluation of structural ceramics. Study of such materials implies high density resolution and high sensitivity to cracks. In fact, with a single circular source trajectory, when the cone-beam aperture increases, density is underestimated and cone shaped artifacts may appear at interfaces in the sample even at relatively small aperture [1–3]. These artifacts limit the thickness we can examine with a planar source trajectory. To maintain optimal reconstruction accuracy with a circular source trajectory, the angular aperture must remain within ±10°. However Kudo and Saito [4] showed that this limit can be slightly overcome by using a special interpolation of the shadow area. But to examine greater thicknesses and to maintain resolution, we must widen the cone-beam aperture thereby decreasing accuracy. To overcome these aperture limitations, Tuy [5] introduced the double circular source trajectory idea.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Standard Techniques

Section

X-Ray and Computed Radiography

Pages

379-386

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_47

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

X-Ray Cone Beam Tomography with Two Tilted Circular Trajectories

Brunswick, ME

Recently 3-D cone-beam tomography has become of interest for the nondestructive evaluation of advanced materials. The main field of application in nondestructive testing is the evaluation of structural ceramics. Study of such materials implies high density resolution and high sensitivity to cracks. In fact, with a single circular source trajectory, when the cone-beam aperture increases, density is underestimated and cone shaped artifacts may appear at interfaces in the sample even at relatively small aperture [1–3]. These artifacts limit the thickness we can examine with a planar source trajectory. To maintain optimal reconstruction accuracy with a circular source trajectory, the angular aperture must remain within ±10°. However Kudo and Saito [4] showed that this limit can be slightly overcome by using a special interpolation of the shadow area. But to examine greater thicknesses and to maintain resolution, we must widen the cone-beam aperture thereby decreasing accuracy. To overcome these aperture limitations, Tuy [5] introduced the double circular source trajectory idea.