Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

A video-based laser speckle technique has been developed for non-contact surface deformation analysis and mapping at speeds approaching video frame rates. This technique, Computed Speckle Decorrelation (CSD), makes use of the speckle decorrelation associated with surface deformation. In its current application, CSD is a method of full field inspection which has been used both to locate fatigue damage sites and to measure damage severity during fatigue deformation in reverse bending fatigue of a cylindrically notched aluminum specimen. With the development of the CSD method it will now be possible to examine in greater detail the progression of fatigue damage in thick graphite/epoxy composite materials, allowing a much faster and much more quantitative analysis than was previously available through film based techniques[1].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Fundamentals of Standard Techniques

Section

Thermal Techniques

Pages

487-494

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_62

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Computed Speckle Decorrelation (CSD) and Its Application for Fatigue Damage Monitoring

Brunswick, ME

A video-based laser speckle technique has been developed for non-contact surface deformation analysis and mapping at speeds approaching video frame rates. This technique, Computed Speckle Decorrelation (CSD), makes use of the speckle decorrelation associated with surface deformation. In its current application, CSD is a method of full field inspection which has been used both to locate fatigue damage sites and to measure damage severity during fatigue deformation in reverse bending fatigue of a cylindrically notched aluminum specimen. With the development of the CSD method it will now be possible to examine in greater detail the progression of fatigue damage in thick graphite/epoxy composite materials, allowing a much faster and much more quantitative analysis than was previously available through film based techniques[1].