Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

First appearing on the commercial market in the mid 1980’s, diode-pumped, continuous-wave (cw) Nd:YAG lasers have more recently been used to obtain visible output, by the incorporation of frequency doubling optics in the laser cavity.The laser diode pumping of a Nd:YAG laser rod is selective and highly efficient, resulting in compact, high power, spatial mode lasers. Frequency-doubling processes are non-linear and lead to doubling TEM00 only of the high energy fundamental temporal mode, resulting in operation of the 532 nm laser in a single spatial and single longitudinal mode. The technology is rapidly advancing, and green lasers with energies of up to 1W could soon be available. The beam properties of the lasers described above are highly desirable in the field of interferometry, where such lasers are now in direct competition with the much larger Argon lasers, which have already been employed in high power interferometric systems. We describe here the performance of a modified Michelson interferometer [1–4], built to incorporate a 90 mW ADLAS 300 diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser. In previous versions of the Michelson interferometer, we have used HeNe lasers with a few milliwatts output, requiring mirror-quality surfaces on our samples. A 90 mW laser power enables us to make displacement measurements on metal surfaces with little or no preparation. The laser could also, of course, be used in other, more elaborate interferometer types, such as the confocal Fabry-Perot, which are better suited to industrial environments.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Evolving Techniques

Section

Laser Ultrasonics

Pages

569-576

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_73

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

A Description of an Improved Homodyne Laser Interferometer

Brunswick, ME

First appearing on the commercial market in the mid 1980’s, diode-pumped, continuous-wave (cw) Nd:YAG lasers have more recently been used to obtain visible output, by the incorporation of frequency doubling optics in the laser cavity.The laser diode pumping of a Nd:YAG laser rod is selective and highly efficient, resulting in compact, high power, spatial mode lasers. Frequency-doubling processes are non-linear and lead to doubling TEM00 only of the high energy fundamental temporal mode, resulting in operation of the 532 nm laser in a single spatial and single longitudinal mode. The technology is rapidly advancing, and green lasers with energies of up to 1W could soon be available. The beam properties of the lasers described above are highly desirable in the field of interferometry, where such lasers are now in direct competition with the much larger Argon lasers, which have already been employed in high power interferometric systems. We describe here the performance of a modified Michelson interferometer [1–4], built to incorporate a 90 mW ADLAS 300 diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser. In previous versions of the Michelson interferometer, we have used HeNe lasers with a few milliwatts output, requiring mirror-quality surfaces on our samples. A 90 mW laser power enables us to make displacement measurements on metal surfaces with little or no preparation. The laser could also, of course, be used in other, more elaborate interferometer types, such as the confocal Fabry-Perot, which are better suited to industrial environments.