Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

In recent years numerous efforts have addressed the substitution of laser-based ultrasonic testing techniques for conventional piezoelectric transducers in demanding applications where contact with the specimen surface is impractical [1]. Ultrasonic signals are typically generated by pulsed laser irradiation of the sample surface [2] and detected by some sort of heterodyne, Fabry-Perot, or path-stabilized Michelson interferometer [3]. While optical methods for generation and detection of ultrasound have performed quite satisfactorily under controlled laboratory conditions, similar success in more demanding industrial environments has proven elusive because the optical techniques suffer limitations with regard to generation efficiency and detection sensitivity. For laser ultrasonics to play a greater role in industrial NDE and on-line process control, substantial improvement in overall system sensitivity must be realized.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Evolving Techniques

Section

Laser Ultrasonics

Pages

601-608

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_77

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Long Cavity Laser Excitation and Digital Filtering of Narrowband Ultrasound for Enhanced Signal-to-Noise Ratio

Brunswick, ME

In recent years numerous efforts have addressed the substitution of laser-based ultrasonic testing techniques for conventional piezoelectric transducers in demanding applications where contact with the specimen surface is impractical [1]. Ultrasonic signals are typically generated by pulsed laser irradiation of the sample surface [2] and detected by some sort of heterodyne, Fabry-Perot, or path-stabilized Michelson interferometer [3]. While optical methods for generation and detection of ultrasound have performed quite satisfactorily under controlled laboratory conditions, similar success in more demanding industrial environments has proven elusive because the optical techniques suffer limitations with regard to generation efficiency and detection sensitivity. For laser ultrasonics to play a greater role in industrial NDE and on-line process control, substantial improvement in overall system sensitivity must be realized.