Location

Brunswick, ME

Start Date

1-1-1992 12:00 AM

Description

In conventional ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation studies, piezoelectric transducers are used to generate sound waves in solids via a couplant that transmits the mechanical motions. In recent years, a different method of generating sound in solids, pulsed laser heating, was introduced by White [1,2]. This method is noncontacting, requires no coupling medium, and operates directly on the surface of the specimen. Noncontacting ultrasonic detection using laser interferometers of several types has also been developed [3]. Laser techniques can achieve essentially point source and point detection of ultrasonic motion through focusing. Laser ultrasonics can, therefore, be used on objects with complex shapes, e.g. curved surfaces, and are applicable to material shapes more commonly found in industry. Often the goal of ultrasonic measurements is to determine material properties such as Lame’s elastic constants. The conventional approach measures longitudinal and shear wave speeds between two parallel flat surfaces. The work reported here demonstrates the versatility of laser ultrasonics by directly measuring the surface motion of a solid sphere generated by ablation from a pulsed laser beam. The results compare well with elastodynamic theoretical calculations, where the ablation source is approximated as a normal impulse on the surface. This work suggests that an algorithm could be formulated to measure elastic properties of targets with curved surfaces.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

11A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Evolving Techniques

Section

Laser Ultrasonics

Pages

609-615

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-3344-3_78

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Analysis of Laser Ultrasonic Measurements of Surface Waves on Elastic Spheres

Brunswick, ME

In conventional ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation studies, piezoelectric transducers are used to generate sound waves in solids via a couplant that transmits the mechanical motions. In recent years, a different method of generating sound in solids, pulsed laser heating, was introduced by White [1,2]. This method is noncontacting, requires no coupling medium, and operates directly on the surface of the specimen. Noncontacting ultrasonic detection using laser interferometers of several types has also been developed [3]. Laser techniques can achieve essentially point source and point detection of ultrasonic motion through focusing. Laser ultrasonics can, therefore, be used on objects with complex shapes, e.g. curved surfaces, and are applicable to material shapes more commonly found in industry. Often the goal of ultrasonic measurements is to determine material properties such as Lame’s elastic constants. The conventional approach measures longitudinal and shear wave speeds between two parallel flat surfaces. The work reported here demonstrates the versatility of laser ultrasonics by directly measuring the surface motion of a solid sphere generated by ablation from a pulsed laser beam. The results compare well with elastodynamic theoretical calculations, where the ablation source is approximated as a normal impulse on the surface. This work suggests that an algorithm could be formulated to measure elastic properties of targets with curved surfaces.