Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 PM

Description

An important aspect of non-destructive testing is the interpretation and classification of signal obtained by NDT methods such as eddy current and ultrasound. These signals are typically complex, non-stationary waveforms, with signals corresponding to a particular class of defect in a specimen having similar form and shape. However, distortions and noise introduced by the measurement system make the manual classification of these signals a time-consuming and unreliable process, with the results affected by operator fatigue and measurement quality. The design of traditional classifiers for this task also poses many difficulties, due to a number of parameters that influence measurement, and the limited understanding of the effect of these parameters on the signal. Recently, artificial neural networks have been applied to a variety of NDT problems, including signal classification, with encouraging results. Artificial neural networks consist of a dense interconnection of simple computational elements, whose interconnection strengths are determined using a predefined learning algorithm, specific to the network. These networks do not require an explicit mathematical modeling of the data they have to process, and are robust even in the presence of noisy data and data generated by strongly non-linear processes [1]. An example of a neural network that has been extensively used in NDT applications is the multilayer perception. However, the error backpropagation algorithm used for training the multilayer perceptron has several disadvantages, such as long training times and susceptibility to local minima. This paper presents a novel approach to defect sizing that involves the use of a radial basis functions network. The network has the advantages of having shorter training times and a parametric nature that allows network optimization on an analytic basis. The application of such a network in the inversion of ultrasonic data to obtain flaw sizing is described. Results from the sizing of defects in aluminium blocks are presented.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12A

Chapter

Chapter 3: Interpretive Signal Processing and Image Analysis

Section

Neural Networks

Pages

819-825

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_104

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 PM

Radial basis functions network for defect sizing

La Jolla, CA

An important aspect of non-destructive testing is the interpretation and classification of signal obtained by NDT methods such as eddy current and ultrasound. These signals are typically complex, non-stationary waveforms, with signals corresponding to a particular class of defect in a specimen having similar form and shape. However, distortions and noise introduced by the measurement system make the manual classification of these signals a time-consuming and unreliable process, with the results affected by operator fatigue and measurement quality. The design of traditional classifiers for this task also poses many difficulties, due to a number of parameters that influence measurement, and the limited understanding of the effect of these parameters on the signal. Recently, artificial neural networks have been applied to a variety of NDT problems, including signal classification, with encouraging results. Artificial neural networks consist of a dense interconnection of simple computational elements, whose interconnection strengths are determined using a predefined learning algorithm, specific to the network. These networks do not require an explicit mathematical modeling of the data they have to process, and are robust even in the presence of noisy data and data generated by strongly non-linear processes [1]. An example of a neural network that has been extensively used in NDT applications is the multilayer perception. However, the error backpropagation algorithm used for training the multilayer perceptron has several disadvantages, such as long training times and susceptibility to local minima. This paper presents a novel approach to defect sizing that involves the use of a radial basis functions network. The network has the advantages of having shorter training times and a parametric nature that allows network optimization on an analytic basis. The application of such a network in the inversion of ultrasonic data to obtain flaw sizing is described. Results from the sizing of defects in aluminium blocks are presented.