Event Title

Experimental Investigation of Ultrasonic Vibrations of Thin Fibers Embedded in Matrix

Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 AM

Description

One of the most challenging problems in nondestructive evaluation of composite materials is the inspection of the fiber/matrix interface. Addison and Sinclair studied the scattering spectra of silicon carbide fibers in titanium metal matrix composites at normal incidence [1]. Although they found that the frequency response of the embedded fiber is very sensitive to small changes in the interfacial bond, this technique cannot be easily adapted to multiple-ply composites. From this point of view, it is more promising to measure the velocity and attenuation of dispersive guided modes propagating along the fibers. It was pointed out by Drescher-Krasicka et al. [2,3] that the presence of leaky guided modes in the fiber can be used for interface characterization. They applied this concept to study mechanical interface properties in an aluminum matrix model composite containing a single large-diameter silicon carbide rod [4]. The same principle can be applied, on a much smaller scale, by using an optical interferometer of very small receiving aperture [5]. Laser interferometry can measure ultrasonic displacement distributions with diffraction-limited “optical” resolution far better than the acoustical wavelength in the 1–50 MHz frequency range. This feature can be exploited to study the vibration of individual fibers in epoxy, metal and ceramic matrix composites. Recently, Scott et al. showed that near-field microscopic pictures of piezoelectric composites taken by laser interferometric detection reveal a number of interesting microscopic features including interfacial characteristics of the fiber/matrix bond [6]. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the acoustic contrast mechanisms contributing to the sensitivity of laser interferometric inspection to interface properties in composite materials.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12B

Chapter

Chapter 5: Engineered Materials

Section

Interfaces

Pages

1499-1506

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_191

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Experimental Investigation of Ultrasonic Vibrations of Thin Fibers Embedded in Matrix

La Jolla, CA

One of the most challenging problems in nondestructive evaluation of composite materials is the inspection of the fiber/matrix interface. Addison and Sinclair studied the scattering spectra of silicon carbide fibers in titanium metal matrix composites at normal incidence [1]. Although they found that the frequency response of the embedded fiber is very sensitive to small changes in the interfacial bond, this technique cannot be easily adapted to multiple-ply composites. From this point of view, it is more promising to measure the velocity and attenuation of dispersive guided modes propagating along the fibers. It was pointed out by Drescher-Krasicka et al. [2,3] that the presence of leaky guided modes in the fiber can be used for interface characterization. They applied this concept to study mechanical interface properties in an aluminum matrix model composite containing a single large-diameter silicon carbide rod [4]. The same principle can be applied, on a much smaller scale, by using an optical interferometer of very small receiving aperture [5]. Laser interferometry can measure ultrasonic displacement distributions with diffraction-limited “optical” resolution far better than the acoustical wavelength in the 1–50 MHz frequency range. This feature can be exploited to study the vibration of individual fibers in epoxy, metal and ceramic matrix composites. Recently, Scott et al. showed that near-field microscopic pictures of piezoelectric composites taken by laser interferometric detection reveal a number of interesting microscopic features including interfacial characteristics of the fiber/matrix bond [6]. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the acoustic contrast mechanisms contributing to the sensitivity of laser interferometric inspection to interface properties in composite materials.