Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 AM

Description

The magnetoacoustic measurement technique has been used successfully for residual stress measurements in laboratory samples[l-4]. However, when used to field test samples with complex geometries, such as railroad wheels, the sensitivity of the method declines dramatically[5,6]. It has been suggested that the decrease in performance may be due, in part, to an insufficient or nonuniform magnetic induction in the test sample[6]. The purpose of this paper is to optimize the test conditions by using finite element modeling to predict the distribution of the induced bulk magnetization of railroad wheels. The results suggest that it is possible to obtain a sufficiently large and uniform bulk magnetization by altering the shape of the electromagnet used in the tests. Consequently, problems associated with bulk magnetization can be overcome, and should not prohibit the magnetoacoustic technique from being used to make residual stress measurements in railroad wheels.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Magnetic Methods and Materials

Pages

1863-1870

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_238

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Finite Element Modeling of the Bulk Magnetization of Railroad Wheels to Improve Test Conditions for Magnetoacoustic Residual Stress Measurements

La Jolla, CA

The magnetoacoustic measurement technique has been used successfully for residual stress measurements in laboratory samples[l-4]. However, when used to field test samples with complex geometries, such as railroad wheels, the sensitivity of the method declines dramatically[5,6]. It has been suggested that the decrease in performance may be due, in part, to an insufficient or nonuniform magnetic induction in the test sample[6]. The purpose of this paper is to optimize the test conditions by using finite element modeling to predict the distribution of the induced bulk magnetization of railroad wheels. The results suggest that it is possible to obtain a sufficiently large and uniform bulk magnetization by altering the shape of the electromagnet used in the tests. Consequently, problems associated with bulk magnetization can be overcome, and should not prohibit the magnetoacoustic technique from being used to make residual stress measurements in railroad wheels.