Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 AM

Description

In many magnetic flux leakage applications, the nondestructive inspection constraints suggest the use of high inspection velocities. However, high inspection velocities can compromise the ability to detect and characterize defects. In general, velocity effects can be detected at speeds exceeding a few miles per hour [1]. These effects need to be quantified in order to have a complete understanding of the capability of the inspection system. This paper presents the application and results of axis- symmetric finite element modeling for the examination of the effects of the magnetizer speed on flux leakage signals. The specific problem addressed is large diameter pipeline steels, and a velocity range of from 0 to 15 miles per hour. The modeling examines the interaction of the magnetizer, pipe material and metal loss defects. Experimental confirmation of selected results is also provided.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Magnetic Methods and Materials

Pages

1890-1898

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_242

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

The Effects of Magnetizer Velocity on Magnetic Flux Leakage Signals

La Jolla, CA

In many magnetic flux leakage applications, the nondestructive inspection constraints suggest the use of high inspection velocities. However, high inspection velocities can compromise the ability to detect and characterize defects. In general, velocity effects can be detected at speeds exceeding a few miles per hour [1]. These effects need to be quantified in order to have a complete understanding of the capability of the inspection system. This paper presents the application and results of axis- symmetric finite element modeling for the examination of the effects of the magnetizer speed on flux leakage signals. The specific problem addressed is large diameter pipeline steels, and a velocity range of from 0 to 15 miles per hour. The modeling examines the interaction of the magnetizer, pipe material and metal loss defects. Experimental confirmation of selected results is also provided.