Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 PM

Description

This research continues our cooperative effort to study the effects of large-scale surface roughness on ultrasonic transmission through interfaces and updates our previously-reported results [1], The Center for Nondestructive Evaluation has developed a model for the propagation of ultrasound through a surface and into an isotropic metal and this model is undergoing experimental validation at Battelle PNL. Once validated, this model will be used as an engineering tool to study the effects of surface conditions upon an ultrasonic inspection of nuclear reactor components. The goal is to quantify and develop requirements to limit the adverse effects of surface conditions during such an inspection. Currently, there are no ASME Code requirements dealing with surface conditions during an UT inspection. Commonplace in the field are abrupt step discontinuities on the order of 1.5 mm. M. S. Good [2] has measured up to a 12 dB signal loss from a 10% through-wall notch due to a 1.5-mm step.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Development of Standard Techniques

Section

Elastic Wave Propagation

Pages

203-210

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_25

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 PM

Ultrasonic propagation through a surface with a step discontinuity: validation of a hybrid, Gauss-Hermite ray tracing beam model

La Jolla, CA

This research continues our cooperative effort to study the effects of large-scale surface roughness on ultrasonic transmission through interfaces and updates our previously-reported results [1], The Center for Nondestructive Evaluation has developed a model for the propagation of ultrasound through a surface and into an isotropic metal and this model is undergoing experimental validation at Battelle PNL. Once validated, this model will be used as an engineering tool to study the effects of surface conditions upon an ultrasonic inspection of nuclear reactor components. The goal is to quantify and develop requirements to limit the adverse effects of surface conditions during such an inspection. Currently, there are no ASME Code requirements dealing with surface conditions during an UT inspection. Commonplace in the field are abrupt step discontinuities on the order of 1.5 mm. M. S. Good [2] has measured up to a 12 dB signal loss from a 10% through-wall notch due to a 1.5-mm step.