Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 AM

Description

The problem of corrosion of steel surfaces under thermal insulation is one that plagues the petroleum, petrochemical, chemical and pipeline industries [1,2]. Often internal surfaces, as well, are subject to attack by moisture, acids or other corrosive influences. Thermal insulation renders traditional NDE methods mostly ineffective but is essentially transparent to x-rays in the energy ranges commonly used for industrial radiography. Since transmission radiography is severely hampered by the need for access to “both sides” of the object being tested, the use of NDE methods employing Compton backscattered x-rays is strongly suggested [3,4]. Through appropriate collimation of incident and backscattered x- rays, depth as well as transverse information concerning the object under examination can be resolved. Access is required only to one side of the object, making the method potentially useful for examination of large vessels as well as pipelines.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Corrosion

Pages

1979-1985

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_253

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Deconvolution of X-Ray Backscatter Diffraction Data for NDE of Corrosion

La Jolla, CA

The problem of corrosion of steel surfaces under thermal insulation is one that plagues the petroleum, petrochemical, chemical and pipeline industries [1,2]. Often internal surfaces, as well, are subject to attack by moisture, acids or other corrosive influences. Thermal insulation renders traditional NDE methods mostly ineffective but is essentially transparent to x-rays in the energy ranges commonly used for industrial radiography. Since transmission radiography is severely hampered by the need for access to “both sides” of the object being tested, the use of NDE methods employing Compton backscattered x-rays is strongly suggested [3,4]. Through appropriate collimation of incident and backscattered x- rays, depth as well as transverse information concerning the object under examination can be resolved. Access is required only to one side of the object, making the method potentially useful for examination of large vessels as well as pipelines.