Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 AM

Description

Corrosion can exist in any layer of a simple aluminum/adhesive lap-splice. For lap- splices where only one aluminum surface is accessible, first layer corrosion is corrosion that occurs on or under the accessible skin; and second layer corrosion is that which exists behind the adhesive/scrim layer on the upper or lower surface of the inaccessible skin. Many different nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques can detect first layer corrosion, and much progress has been made quantifying corrosion that exists in this layer[l]. Due to the layered nature of a lap-splice, second layer corrosion is much more difficult to detect, and also more difficult to quantify. Current maintenance procedures also make it difficult for researchers to obtain lap-splice corrosion samples from serviceable aircraft. The detection of corrosion in lap-splice assemblies has been given an important inspection priority by the airline industry, and regular inspection procedures have been developed to meet these new requirements. During maintenance, if corrosion is suspected in a lap-splice area, the area is opened up for further inspection by removing the rivets, adhesive and sometimes the paint. If the corrosion damage is beyond the manufacturer’s tolerances, the corroded area is cut out and patch-repaired; otherwise, the corrosion is removed by chemical or mechanical means, leaving a serviceable but thinner metal skin when the joint is reassembled[2]. In either case the original character of the lap-splice has been destroyed by the maintenance process, and its use for NDE purposes is lost. In this light, it becomes necessary for researchers to fabricate their own laboratory samples and compare these artificial samples with actual in-service samples.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Material Properties

Section

Corrosion

Pages

1995-2002

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_255

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Investigation of Corrosion in Aluminum/Adhesive Lap-Splices Using Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Techniques

La Jolla, CA

Corrosion can exist in any layer of a simple aluminum/adhesive lap-splice. For lap- splices where only one aluminum surface is accessible, first layer corrosion is corrosion that occurs on or under the accessible skin; and second layer corrosion is that which exists behind the adhesive/scrim layer on the upper or lower surface of the inaccessible skin. Many different nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques can detect first layer corrosion, and much progress has been made quantifying corrosion that exists in this layer[l]. Due to the layered nature of a lap-splice, second layer corrosion is much more difficult to detect, and also more difficult to quantify. Current maintenance procedures also make it difficult for researchers to obtain lap-splice corrosion samples from serviceable aircraft. The detection of corrosion in lap-splice assemblies has been given an important inspection priority by the airline industry, and regular inspection procedures have been developed to meet these new requirements. During maintenance, if corrosion is suspected in a lap-splice area, the area is opened up for further inspection by removing the rivets, adhesive and sometimes the paint. If the corrosion damage is beyond the manufacturer’s tolerances, the corroded area is cut out and patch-repaired; otherwise, the corrosion is removed by chemical or mechanical means, leaving a serviceable but thinner metal skin when the joint is reassembled[2]. In either case the original character of the lap-splice has been destroyed by the maintenance process, and its use for NDE purposes is lost. In this light, it becomes necessary for researchers to fabricate their own laboratory samples and compare these artificial samples with actual in-service samples.