Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 PM

Description

As the age of airplanes in the commercial fleet has increased, inspection and maintenance costs have steadily increased. The fact that aircraft have a fairly complicated structure and operate under a wide range of environmental conditions means that detection of the onset of structural deterioration is often difficult. In particular, corrosion of aluminum structures may begin on interior layers and be visually evident only at fairly advanced stages. Present maintenance requirements dictate that airplane skin (typical thickness 1mm) must be repaired if more than 10% thickness of the material has corroded[l]. A number of nondestructive inspection techniques are being applied to assist in early detection of corrosion in aircraft structures[2]. However, it is often difficult to determine whether these small thickness variations are due to corrosive material loss or to inherent variations introduced in the manufacturing process. X-ray scattering is sensitive to variations in material type and density, and hence offers the possibility of distinguishing between corroded material and intrinsic thickness variations.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Development of Standard Techniques

Section

Radiography and CT

Pages

303-308

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_38

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 PM

Material thickness measurements using Compton backscatter

La Jolla, CA

As the age of airplanes in the commercial fleet has increased, inspection and maintenance costs have steadily increased. The fact that aircraft have a fairly complicated structure and operate under a wide range of environmental conditions means that detection of the onset of structural deterioration is often difficult. In particular, corrosion of aluminum structures may begin on interior layers and be visually evident only at fairly advanced stages. Present maintenance requirements dictate that airplane skin (typical thickness 1mm) must be repaired if more than 10% thickness of the material has corroded[l]. A number of nondestructive inspection techniques are being applied to assist in early detection of corrosion in aircraft structures[2]. However, it is often difficult to determine whether these small thickness variations are due to corrosive material loss or to inherent variations introduced in the manufacturing process. X-ray scattering is sensitive to variations in material type and density, and hence offers the possibility of distinguishing between corroded material and intrinsic thickness variations.