Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1993 12:00 PM

Description

In the manufacture of semiconductor devices, it is of critical importance to know the thickness and material properties of various dielectric and semiconducting thin films. Although there are many techniques for measuring these films, the most commonly used are reflection spectrophotometry [1,2] and ellipsometry [3]. In the former method, the normal- incidence reflectivity is measured as a function of wavelength. The shape of the reflectivity spectrum is then analyzed using the Fresnel equations to determine the thickness of the film. In some cases, the refractive index can also be determined provided that the dispersion of the optical constants are well known. The latter method consists of reflecting a beam of known polarization off the sample surface at an oblique angle. The film thickness, and in some cases the refractive index, can be determined from the change in polarization experienced upon reflection.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

12A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Development of Standard Techniques

Section

Optical Techniques

Pages

387-394

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-2848-7_50

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 PM

Beam profile reflectometry: a new technique for thin film measurements

La Jolla, CA

In the manufacture of semiconductor devices, it is of critical importance to know the thickness and material properties of various dielectric and semiconducting thin films. Although there are many techniques for measuring these films, the most commonly used are reflection spectrophotometry [1,2] and ellipsometry [3]. In the former method, the normal- incidence reflectivity is measured as a function of wavelength. The shape of the reflectivity spectrum is then analyzed using the Fresnel equations to determine the thickness of the film. In some cases, the refractive index can also be determined provided that the dispersion of the optical constants are well known. The latter method consists of reflecting a beam of known polarization off the sample surface at an oblique angle. The film thickness, and in some cases the refractive index, can be determined from the change in polarization experienced upon reflection.